Recorded on October 26, 2021.

Anxiety is one of those emotions that most of us would probably like to avoid or never experience at all, if possible. And yet, unfortunately, it’s an emotion that most of us are increasingly familiar with, as we contend with the many challenges and complexities of modern life. In fact, it’s an emotion so common today, it’s estimated that 90 percent of the population has experienced some form of anxiety at least once in their lives while about 40 million people – or 18% of the population – suffer from clinical anxiety disorders.

Despite the negativity associated with the term, our guest – world-renowned neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki – believes that anxiety can actually be used as a powerful and positive force in our lives, making us more productive, creative, and resilient. As she explains in her new book, Good Anxiety: Harnessing the Power of the Most Misunderstood Emotion, Dr. Suzuki says she has found a way to unlock the potential of anxiety for good and shares how anxiety can actually be a crucial component for living a fulfilling life. Drawing from her personal experience with anxiety and the latest in neuroscience research, she shares strategies and tangible steps we can all take to help us transform our various forms of anxiety into powerful tools that can change our lives and propel us forward.


Secure YOUR complimentary copy Of Good Anxiety: Harnessing the Power of the Most Misunderstood Emotion here.

About Wendy Suzuki

Dr. Wendy Suzuki is a Professor of Neural Science and Psychology in the Center for Neural Science at New York University and celebrated international authority on neuroplasticity. She was recently named one of the 10 women changing the way we see the world by Good Housekeeping and regularly serves as a sought-after expert for publications including The Wall Street Journal, Shape, and Health. Her TED talk has more than 31 million views on Facebook and was the 2nd most viewed TED talk of 2018. Her first book Healthy Brain Happy Life was recently made into a PBS special.